What To Expect From This Blog

What To Expect From This Blog

Since my diagnosis with Crohn’s Disease several years ago, I’ve tried the gluten-free/dairy-free diet, the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), the almost-vegan-high-carb-low-fat diet, the eat-pretty-much-whatever-Martine-wants-except-dairy-because-that-one-really-hurts-coming-out diet, the 80/20 paleo diet, the strict paleo diet, the autoimmune paleo (AIP) diet, the AIP-with-occasional-eggs-and-nuts diet…

All of that trial and error is just part of a “process,” or as one dictionary defines that word, “a series of actions that lead to a particular result.” For all of us, that “particular result” is the very reason we engage with a given process in the first place.

And so while I’m learning to be patient as I continually strive for my “particular result,” which is feeling healthy and sound in body and mind, I keep educating myself and tweaking my choices as they pertain to food, exercise, and managing stress.

Before I get to a quick summary of what’s working for me — disclaimer! — I must mention that while I’m an advocate for using lifestyle and food to manage autoimmune symptoms (because doing so has brought amazing and positive changes in my own life), I am “obvi” (to quote from the beloved Shoshi) not a doctor. I always listen carefully and respectfully to and work closely with my team of medical professionals, as should anyone with a serious autoimmune condition.

Okay, so back to the “process.” Here’s a brief, truncated list of what is working remarkably well for me:

  • I’m devoted to eating anti-inflammatory foods that I know will not feed or exacerbate dis-ease and inflammation.
  • I maintain a regular practice of yoga and meditation.
  • I’ve scaled back on my secular work (teaching post-secondary English and Communications) because I find too many hours in the classroom stressful, and, for now, I enjoy expanding my freelance writing and editing work.
  • I most often use the “Paleo Autoimmune Protocol” (AIP) and “Specific Carbohydrate Diet” as a framework but will occasionally eat nuts/seeds and eggs (never nightshades – ouchity ouch!).
  • Once in a while, I’ll also have an ounce or two of alcohol at social/celebratory occasions, not because I’m a killjoy, but because alcohol really isn’t all that nice to me as it works its way through my digestive tract.
  • I take a biologic (anti-TNF) to treat specific symptoms related to the type of Crohn’s I have, which is fistulising and perianal. Since going grain-free and dairy-free, however, any increase in Crohn’s symptoms amounts to a mere blip in my life rather than a full-on crisis of a flare-up. Huzzah!

What does this mean for my blog?

  • My focus is on nutrient-dense food.
  • You can consistently expect recipes for grain-free, dairy-free, legume-free, nightshade-free, and refined sugar-free dishes.
  • From time to time, you’ll also find recipes that use eggs and nuts/seeds.
  • I always share recipes that are tried and tested on my family and friends and that contain high levels of yum.
  • Occasionally, I’ll ruminate on other aspects of using lifestyle balance and food as medicine; I’ll chat about how these adjustments impact me, especially as a person living with an autoimmune disease.

So there you have it! Thanks again for stopping by, and I hope we can keep on keepin’ on in this “process” together.

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This article was written by

Martine Partridge, founder of Eat Heal Thrive, is an eater of whole, nourishing, real food. She is also a combatter of Crohn's Disease. Martine wholeheartedly believes that food is the fulcrum for good health and has had wonderful results in managing autoimmunity by eating to heal, and healing to thrive.

There are 3 comments for this article
  1. Stella at 3:32 pm

    I absolutely love your blog. I think your recipes are so easy to follow and of course delicious!
    I have a question about the anti-TNF you’re taking – is it infliximab (remicade)?
    I was diagnosed with Crohn’s back in May and almost needed surgery for a severe stricture and a fistula but they decided to put me on an 8 week high dose of steroids instead. While on the steroids (which I finished 6 weeks ago) I have been following the AIP very strictly and I’m doing very well with no symptoms at all but when I told the doctors that I don’t want to begin my infliximab treatment they said I would be taking a HUGE risk not to as my symptoms would likely return very soon. I’m terrified of being on this drug and I wish I could go it alone with the diet. I think I’ve resigned to the fact that AIP alone is not an option for me. It’s a comfort to me to know that you’re doing both. How are you finding the anti-TNF treatment?

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