Scalloped Notatoes (Paleo, AIP)

Scalloped Notatoes (Paleo, AIP)

One of my favourite food finds since going paleo is the scrumptious celeriac (celery root). Don’t let this knobby, bulbous root vegetable fool you! What lies within the confines of its tough skin is a most delicious, low-starch flesh with a delightfully subtle flavour.

My gotta-create-AIP-friendly-comfort-food kick from last week, which culminated in the development of the Cauli-Cheese sauce, trickles over into this week with the creation of these Scalloped Notatoes. I served this for dinner the other night, and after his first couple of bites, my husband reached over to give me his fist-bump of approval. I was also quite chuffed that the seasoned (see what I did there?) tastebuds of my mother-in-law — who is visiting us and getting, needless to say, a crash course in paleo and AIP — deemed this a pleasing dish.

So my advice to you is if you haven’t yet given celeriac a chance, get on it! Don’t let its intimidating and harsh appearance put you off. In fact, start by experiencing its high yum-factor with these Scalloped Notatoes. They’re totally gnarly (yes, pun intended), as in beyond radical, as in off-the-hook awesome, as in trust me. You’ll dig ‘em (ooops, I did it again).

Scalloped Notatoes (Paleo, AIP)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • Sauce Ingredients:
  • 2 c cauliflower florets
  • ½ c reserved water from steaming
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1½ tsp lemon juice
  • ½ tsp salt, or to taste
  • ¼ tsp granulated garlic
  • 1 tsp gelatin
  • ⅛ tsp dry mustard powder or ¼ tsp mustard (This is an option provided you are not following AIP.)
  • Remaining Ingredients:
  • 1 medium-large celeriac
  • 1 shallot
  • Cauli-Cheese Sauce (see above)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • a few sprigs of fresh dill
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8x8 baking dish. Set aside.
  2. For the sauce, first steam the cauliflower florets until soft. Drain and reserve ½ c steaming water. Place cauliflower in a high-speed blender or food processor along with the reserved water. Add all other ingredients and process until smooth. I like to make this ahead of time and refrigerate for ease of assembling the Scalloped Notatoes.
  3. Peel and cut the celeriac into eighths. Thinly slice each ⅛ portion to about ⅛ inch in thickness. Layer the sliced celeriac in a greased 8x8 dish. Sprinkle with finely minced shallot. Spread Cauli-Cheese Sauce over the celeriac and shallot. Add salt and pepper to taste. Chop fresh dill and sprinkle on top.
  4. Bake uncovered for 50-60 minutes or until the celeriac is tender and topping is nicely browned.
 

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This article was written by

Martine Partridge, founder of Eat Heal Thrive, is an eater of whole, nourishing, real food. She is also a combatter of Crohn's Disease. Martine wholeheartedly believes that food is the fulcrum for good health and has had wonderful results in managing autoimmunity by eating to heal, and healing to thrive.

There are 10 comments for this article
  1. Pingback: A-Z Vegetable Recipe Roundup (Wahls + Paleo AIP) | Phoenix Helix
  2. Pingback: Fragrant Celeriac Rice (AIP, Low-FODMAP, Paleo, SCD, Vegan, Whole30 ) - The Paleo Partridge
    • Martine Partridge Author at 12:08 am

      Hi, Penny. I can’t do dairy, so this recipe relies on a creamy sauce that somewhat resembles a “cheese” sauce. The base of that sauce is cauliflower as listed in the first part of the recipe ingredients. 🙂

  3. Terry at 10:28 pm

    I made this the other night, and it was delicious! My non-Paleo-eating husband loved it and couldn’t believe how creamy it was!! Definite thumbs-up, and we’ll be having it again. Thanks for the great recipe!

  4. Basmah at 5:08 am

    when you say steam the cauliflower, you don’t mean boil, right? I have a steamer, but I am not sure what you mean by draining and reserving some of the water – does the cauliflower release some juice? I am obviously somewhat new to this.

    • Alana at 11:56 pm

      Hi Basmah, When you steam a vegetable, you use a small amount of water (1-2 inches is usually what I use). This water boils under the steamer and the steam cooks the cauliflower. The water you use will have some flavor from whatever veggie you are steaming. Hopefully that answers your question!

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